I set this aside after finishing it and I almost wished I hadn't read it. And with fresh wounds from the Newtown and Charleston shootings, never has the need for understanding been more urgent. March 11, 2016 Paige Reviews 0 ★★★★ A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold Published by Crown on February 15, 2016 Genres: Adult Nonfiction, Memoir Pages: 336 Format: eBook Source: Bought Goodreads This book is Klebold’s attempt to tell her story: the story of their family life, their parenting, and the complete and utter lack of signs leading up to. That seems to be the premise of this book and makes it the ideal choice for the buddy with whom I chose to read this. Sue Klebold's life as she knew it ended abruptly on that day 17 years ago when she not only lost her son, but was left behind to piece together a puzzle that could never be complet. Later, they make a pact not to kill themselves, so hard is surviving. I give Klebold much credit for writing this book and for putting herself out here where many will continue to ridicule her, hold her in contempt or just full out not believe what she has to say. Let me start off by saying whenever one of these horrific events happens, I always feel so badly for the family because I know they are going to be blamed and that is not fair at all. (Having raised a son, I can attest that teenagers are often a difficult species to decode.). (She actually calls it brain health and brain illness throughout her book, for a very smart reason. I do hope for Klebold that writing this book has helped her find some peace. She had to grieve the loss of her son in so many ways: the boy she knew and loved, as well as the boy she didn't know, who did the unthinkable. Sue Klebold expresses the emotional turmoil from the moment she receives the frantic call from her husband to come home from work on that horrific day, and documents the difficult task of trying to unravel the mystery of a son they loved and thought they knew so well. Anxiety, sensory overload, shaking, scratching, crying, dark thoughts and an overwhelming need to hurt myself and control the pain. She dove into motherhood and did her best to mother with intent and purpose. I feel a lot of compassion for her. It is actually the exact opposite of that, and at times, almost has nothing to do with her son, but more of raising awareness on suicide and mental health. However 80% of this book is her telling me what a normal family they were and what I normal childhood he had (and I believe it) and the other 20% that he had a brain disease and was suicidal (and I believe that too). I have to admit I felt a little hesitant to order this at first, until I saw. I was stunned when I saw the news that day but I can't recall ever considering how the mothers of the shooters might be feeling. They murdered thirteen people – twelve students and a teacher – and injured twenty-four. There is no way to tell and while media outlets seem to bask in finding a whipping boy, finger pointing serves no fruitful purpose. Sue Klebold is Dylan’s mother. Like other reviewers have said, this is a hard book to review. Poor victims and their loved ones!" A Mother’s Reckoning – Review by Lee. A Mother’s Reckoning is a sincere gesture in sharing and I thought Sue Klebold shared some very important information, messages and insight to living in the aftermath of tragedy. Summary (from Goodreads): On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. I only finished it recently. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Ever. This story is about how Sue Klebold, Dylan’s mother, has coped with her … We’d love your help. The journey to becoming a so called monster was too complex, and to understand why they came to do inhuman things you first need to understand how they were as humans in the first place. Published by wendopolis. Mental refers to something intangible, and some experts believe that if we change the terminology from ment. ... Posted in Uncategorized Book review mothers sons. And, as she says, she and her husband Tom were “good” parents. January 14, 2017 January 14, 2017 ~ wendopolis. In this account, Klebold also takes full responsibility for missing the signs that Dylan was depressed and in trouble admitting he did in fact show outward signals of suicide that she dismissed not recognizing them for what they were at the time, but now understands after consulting with numerous mental health experts. Book Review ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ doesn’t dig deep enough. In the wake of epic tragedy, how does a parent come to terms with their child murdering other children and adults? But She persisted in thinking everything was OK, even though Dylan had been suspended from school and arrested for stealing, with Harris, electronic equipment from a parked van. I was stunned when I saw the news that day but I can't recall ever considering how the mothers of the shooters might be feeling. Yet by her own account, Klebold seems to have viewed parenting mainly as an act of setting boundaries and providing a nice middle-class home, complete with after-school snacks, rather than really listening closely to her child. Out of the worst tragedies there surely sprouts some specks light and hope. But once she realises that Dylan was depressed, she begins to simplify her narrative, ascribing his participation that day to his “brain” illness and the insidious influence of Harris. What kind of parent are you? It was nearly impossible not to, considering I spent my time reading their journals, private online conversations, websites, jokes, accounts from friends and loved ones and teachers who liked and praised them as well as watching homemade videos they made for fun. It is actually the exact opposite of that, and at times, almost has nothing to do with her son, but more of raising awareness on suicide and mental health. How ought we to think about moral culpability in an age of psychiatric diagnoses? If nothing else was accomplished (and there definitely is more), this book has changed my outlook. A MOTHER'S RECKONING is a detailed and graphic account of the carefully planned massacre that occurred at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999. And part of my understanding at least a piece of this puzzle, I thought, was reading about the perspective of the woman who had raised Dylan. Addressing teen suicide and the inner turmoil that Dylan faced, Sue is blunt in her message to parents: do not ignore anything that seems out of place. A powerful book that does offer insight, angst, pain, and confusion in all forms, Klebold is to be applauded for coming out and speaking about these hard issues in a frank manner. This book is heart wrenching and fascinating, but it very much feels like something Sue Klebold had to write for her own benefit, as part of her own healing process. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Rolling in Raindrops. Yet we persist in believing (it would be hopeless not to) that, once they arrive, we will in some deep way know our children, even as we grasp that parts of them will remain a mystery to us. This tension is at the heart of Sue Klebold’s gripping, troubling and bestselling memoir, A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy, which recounts one of the most horrible experiences a parent can endure: the death of a child, compounded by the shocking realisation that you failed to know him. It is so heartbreaking. Beneath the surface of any teenager's emotional expressions can be found torrential angst and calls for help. Welcome back. I was not a mother when Columbine happened. Final Note: Author profits from this book will be donated to research and charitable foundations focusing on mental health issues. Even she understands how difficult it is for people to accept that sometimes parents don't know that their child is planning to do something terrible, and that if the child does do something terrible, that the terrible act is not always the result of poor parenting. April 20, 1999 – Columbine High School – Littleton, Colorado. As she tells the story, when Dylan called out “bye” the morning of the attacks, she heard in his tone “a sneer, almost, as if he’d been caught in the middle of a fight with someone”. Both come down to a kind of moral luck and accident of biology. (In fact, at times I felt ashamed of some of my own parenting lapses in comparison with hers.) I finished this audiobook more than two weeks ago and I still really don't know how to review it. A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold Published by Crown on February 15, 2016 Genres: Non-Fiction, Memoir, True Crime Goodreads | Buy on Book Depository. There’s no question that Klebold’s story is horrifying—a story of mass murder and its aftermath that blessed few of us will ever have to tell. In the dazed aftermath, stories abounded: the killers were goths, were bullied, were part of a terrifying “trenchcoat mafia”. I am not sure how you review something like this - a mother's recounting of a cherished son's life, the heinous act he commits and the aftermath of that act on her life and family. For now I will say that this broke my heart with it's bravery, honesty and compassion. Perhaps the most unnerving thing about having a child is that you don’t know in advance who he or she or “they” will turn out to be. I knew a little about the Columbine tragedy and felt lucky to read this with an open mind. The narrative arc takes us from denial to anger to acceptance and some kind of comprehension. What was done can’t be undone. Columbine High School shooting. They also planted bombs that – had they functioned as planned – would have taken the lives of hundreds more. ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ is a rare insight into the life of a parent of a school shooter. Refresh and try again. A Mother’s Reckoning is a sincere gesture in sharing and I thought Sue Klebold shared some very important information, messages and insight to living in the aftermath of tragedy. In addition, there were death threats, copious hate mail, unending questions, unfathomable guilt, endless lawsuits and public scrutiny. Dylan Kleb. Writing 16 years after the. And if the bombs they planted had gone off it would have been much worse. They are also a victim. Ever. But I am left with the uncomfortable feeling that she is looking for some form of public salvation – through the lengthy reflections on her good parenting and on the efforts she has made since Columbine to be a good person despite the circumstances. The diagnosis closes her questioning down. However 80% of this book is her telling me what a normal family they were and what I normal childhood he had (and I believe it) and the other 20% that he had a brain disease and was suicidal (and I believe that too). This book deserves a more eloquent review than I can muster this late in the evening. I'll never, ever again "assume" anything close to this kind of thinking or judge. To see what your friends thought of this book, I agree with those who have said it gives one a renewed sense of purpose. A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy is written by Sue Klebold, mother of Dylan Klebold. What kind of mother fails to see that her son is a killer? Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Anyway, again I don't blame her or her husband but frankly I got really bored with reading antecdotes about smart precocious funny Dylan. This is not to toss all the blame onto Harris, but Klebold posits throughout that her son's less aggressive nature surfaced in journal entries, recorded messages, and in footage of the actual school shooting. It was heartbreaking. A Mother’s Reckoning by Sue Klebold. It took me three very long days to get through this book and I honestly wish that I did not read it. Let me start off by saying whenever one of these horrific events happens, I always feel so badly for the family because I know they are going to be blamed and that is not fair at all. This is a very painful book to read. A Mother’s Reckoning implicates the reader in its own search for understanding; it’s part confessional, part grief-memoir, part apology and part activist literature. A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of the Columbine Tragedy is a hard but important look at the life of Dylan Klebold, and the legacy he left for parents Sue and Tom, and brother Byron. First, I want to deeply discredit reviews that state this book is nothing but a mother making excuses for her son. Ever since I started the research, I knew I couldn't view them as monsters because it was far too simplistic. This book is heart wrenching and fascinating, but it very much feels like something Sue Klebold had to write for her own. They had nothing to do with murders but people judge them and make their life a living hell. Klebold bears not only her soul in her writing of A Mother's Reckoning, but also her failures as a parent that often are only evident in hindsight. Worse if the child’s death is a suicide. How did you not know that he was planning to blow up Columbine High School? Along with her personal devastation, she was grief-stricken for the victims, their families, and the community. I can’t say that I wouldn’t do the same if I found myself in her shoes. to come to terms with her son Dylan’s role in the infamous. It’s hard to criticise a book that so earnestly and willingly embraces self-exposure. Sigh, where to start. The saddest thing that can happen to a mother is to outlive her child. A Mother’s Reckoning, book review. Her book is titled, “A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy,” and in it she chronicles the day of April 20, 1999 and the weeks following based on her journals. He stockpiled assault weapons and murdered five of his peers during an extended rampage. However, with the power of hindsight, Klebold could see what might have been warning signs of the smallest order. I read this book because a friend of mine suggested it. If a true crime audiobook is your idea of the perfect listen, then this post is for you. It's a horrible story and one that we sadly see repeated year after year; and it's hard not to feel defeated, like things will never change and there's nothing we can do about it. This book is about Sue Klebold, Dylan's (one of the shooters) mother, who has lived with the indescribable grief and shame of that day. On July 22, 2016 By thehodgenator In adult, nonfiction, the hodgenator. She did so many things right by writing this book. For the rest of us, her book provides a window into a special kind of hell – losing a child that the world views as a monster. Instead of becoming paral, Sue Klebold is the mother of Dylan Klebold, one of the two shooters at Columbine High School in 1999 who killed 15 people before ending their own lives, a tragedy that saddened and galvanized the nation. Having interviewed and spoken with countless professionals over the years, she shares in the second half of the book the studies and professional opinions that support a greater emphasis on understanding, removing the stigma around, and treating brain health issues. Filled with hard-won wisdom and compassion, A Mother’s Reckoning is a powerful and haunting book that sheds light on one of the most pressing issues of our time. When we hear about the actions of murderers we always think to ourselves: "How could they've done that? Yet we persist in believing (it would be hopeless not to) that, once they arrive, we will in some deep way. This book reads like a taut justification defending how good her family is, while very subtly hinting at how "others" live: I found Sue Klebold to be honest, empathic, and credible with the facts she gathered and presented them well, and willing to take responsibility for her son. A great deal of this memoir is written from the perspective of what actually happened in the Klebold family world from the time of awareness. A great deal of this memoir is written from the perspective of what ac. Looks like I am in the minority on this one. A teacher flagged a story he had written – from the point of view of a gunman – as disturbingly violent. Book: A Mother's Reckoning: Living In the Aftermath of Tragedy Author: Sue Klebold On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed twelve students and a teacher at Columbine High School. To say "I really liked it" is not accurate; but I am so very glad that I read this book (huge thank you to Dave Cullen for the recommendation). I had a bad night a week ago. Mental refers to something intangible, and some experts believe that if we change the terminology from mental health to brain health, because the brain is something tangible that we KNOW needs attention, it could help people be more open to truths of mental/brain illness). Like Klebold, I wanted to hear the answers to these questions, and I eagerly awaited for her book to be published to see what she had to say and to see what we all could learn from it. Instead of becoming paralyzed by her grief and remorse, she has become a passionate and effective agent working tirelessly to advance mental health awareness and intervention. She has written one of the most honest and gut-wrenching books I’ve read in a long time. True crime has been enjoying something... On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. I give my thoughts on the book by Sue Klebold (mother of Dylan Klebold) 'A Mothers Reckoning. There is no way we can expect her to have anticipated Columbine, especially as there was little precedent for it – she had the bad luck to be mother to a depressed teen whose anger intersected with Harris’s incipient psychopathy in a spectacularly toxic manner. It was nearly impossible not to, considering I spent my time reading their journals, private online conversations, websites, jokes, accounts from friends and loved ones and teachers who liked and praised them as well as watching homemade videos they made for fun. Over the years, after a long time researching the Columbine case, I'd learned to view Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris as human beings. I finished this audiobook more than two weeks ago and I still really don't know how to review it. On the one hand, I sympathize with Klebold, but I have to say that I think publishing this book was a mistake. And she is condemned to a life in which some people will always try to reassure themselves that their child would never do what Dylan did by blaming his parents in their parenting and for failing to see what was coming – no matter what Klebold has to say.

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